Heritage Railways to Reopen Again

Heritage Railways to Reopen Again

Due to the pandemic and Covid-19 lockdowns (since the 5th January 2021), all the Heritage Railways have been closed to customers.

Lets hope that circumstances and the government doesn’t change its mind. Then in May 2021, the passenger trains will be allowed to run once again.

Naturally, enthusiasts and customers will be excited. Many passengers miss travelling and will be keen to get back to their favourite routes as soon as possible. Of course, many enthusiasts miss their favourite subject for their photography. They will be keen to take photos of the trains and the areas they’re stationed at.

GWR 0-6-0PT No: 1369 is seen at Woodville on the South Devon Railway working the 15.25 Totnes Riverside to Buckfastleigh service on the 5th October 2019
Photo Details: GWR 0-6-0PT No: 1369 is seen at Woodville on the South Devon Railway working the 15.25 Totnes Riverside to Buckfastleigh service on the 5th October 2019

Because of the pandemic, this hobby has had to halt for a great deal of the population. Railway photography was a pastime that, in normal times, could be enjoyed on any given day, at any time. It’s unlikely that most photographers would have expected such a big break from their passion.

For those who enjoy train photography and treat it as a very serious activity, it certainly must have been a bit of a jolt for it to all suddenly have to stop. All railway photographers up and down the country are eagerly waiting when they can return to photographing classic trains again.

Cost of Heritage Railways

All Heritage Railways will be pleased that they can open again soon. The railways cost money, even when they are closed. Maintenance of the trains, stations and track etc does not come cheap. For these reasons, Heritage Railways will be very keen to earn money once again. They will spend it where needed and to keep everything ticking along nicely.

Some heritage railway organisations only survived thanks to the generosity of others. For example, the Swanage Railway in Dorset lost £2 million in revenue and had to abandon a project creating much-needed sheds for their carriages. In 2020, passenger numbers fell by 58,000 – meaning revenue was hit in a big way. However, thanks to the Swanage Railway’s Save our Service Appeal, they survived, raising an amazing £360,000. It’s likely that many more appeals will be needed to be set up. Other heritage organisations can then attempt to recoup some of their losses. One of the best ways you’ll be able to offer support is to use their services as soon as they reopen. Also encourage others to do the same.

Enjoying heritage trains is an important part of many people’s schedule and something they’ve been missing a lot. Let’s hope they manage to make a good recovery from the very difficult months they’ve had to endure. No doubt, they can’t wait to get people back on the trains. Travellers can also look forward to the journeys once again.

Conclusion

So, all of you railway photographers can rejoice that you should have a date in sight soon! I certainly will be out to my two local heritage railways, the South Devon Railway and Dartmouth Steam Railway.

Photo Details: L94 (GWR 5700 'Pannier Tank' Class 7752) is seen crossing Broadsands viaduct on the Dartmouth Steam Railway working the 12.15 Paignton to Kingswear service during the KingsBeer Festival on the 14th July 2018
Photo Details: L94 (GWR 5700 ‘Pannier Tank’ Class 7752) is seen crossing Broadsands viaduct on the Dartmouth Steam Railway working the 12.15 Paignton to Kingswear service during the KingsBeer Festival on the 14th July 2018

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